Vizcaya Museum & Gardens, also known as Villa Vizcaya, Miami's exotic, paradisiacal house museum, recently celebrated its centennial. Built in 1917 for International Harvester scion James Deering, the house is a sublime melding of art and architecture into a cohesive, exotic whole.
The developer who recently purchased the Office in the Grove building, designed and constructed in 1970 by important local architect Kenneth Treister, appears to be very serious about his or her intentions to demolish it, and has already destroyed the original lobby.
3467 Moorings Way, designed by the classic Miami architect Walter De Garmo in 1929, is back on the market for a very nice $8.75 million. In addition to a fantastic restoration, some sublime historical details, a grand living room, a louche and luxuriant pool, and some fantastic gardens, the house sits at arguably the grandest spot in the exclusive enclave of The Moorings in Coconut Grove.
Kenneth Treister, one of Miami's most iconic architects, helped define the subtropical modernist postwar look of many of Miami's more jungly neighborhoods around Miami. The interior of the Golden Girls set, for example, is reminiscent of a design by Treister or his compatriot Alfred Browning Parker. The living room practically screamed "Kenneth Treister!"
A few years ago at Curbed Miami, I wrote about the Chart House, a waterfront restaurant in Coconut Grove that had been around for years but was up for demolition along with the longtime local hangout Scotty's Landing, in the wake of the redevelopment of the Coconut Grove Waterfront.
Grosvenor is the famous last name of the British Dukes of Westminster, a prominent family in that country that goes all the way back to the Battle of Hastings in 1066. Grosvenor House, in London, is a luxury hotel that stands on the former site of the family's palatial townhouse. In Miami, there's a condo tower called Grovenor House. It has nothing to do with the family or the hotel, and no, its name isn't a misspelling. It's a pun. Developed by CMC Group, is in Coconut Grove. Get it?
This classic Coconut Grove house was built in 1910 for an original Grove family the Peacocks, according to the brokerbabble. It looks like it's had quite the swanky re-do that will guarantee its preservation. Sure, it's missing its old bathrooms and some of the original details, but many of the others have been saved, including that sensational atrium.
Coronavirus may be raging over all our heads, but the world must go on in some way, and interesting properties are still coming on the market, including this adorable--and restored--historic cottage in South Coconut Grove, built in 1915. The wooden house at 4286 S Douglas Road hit the market yesterday, for $1.499 million.