Designed by Achille Salvagni, an Italian designer and architect who has done some incredible yacht interiors but also has a flair for midcentury Italian design, this 7,400 square foot new-build in Mid-Beach was designed almost like a superyacht itself. The house has curvilinear lines and fabulous materials, creating custom elements like a kitchen that looks more like a sculptural art installation than a place to make food, and a bronze and gold grand staircase. It's also got a pool that, at 90 feet in length, spans almost the entire 111-foot width of the property itself. Originally listed for $21 million in March, it got a price cut to $19 million, according to the MLS, in May.
Miami Beach, a city of hotels, is often known for its most famous establishments of yesterday and today: places like the Fontainebleau, the Eden Roc, and the Delano. But there are scores of lesser-known hotels that have come and gone and often show different, more surprising sides to the beach. A catalog of hotel postcards from the University of Miami Libraries shows some of the big famous hotels, but even more smaller establishments that have been almost forgotten over the years. Check them out, this way.
A rather psychedelic new gym designed by one of Miami's boldest young architects has just opened on Lincoln Road. Manuel Clavel Rojo of Clavel Arquitectos, perhaps best known locally for designing part of the surreal Museum Garage in the Design District (the section with the cars suspended off the side), has designed the brand-new Miami incarnation of Gymage, a Madrid-based gym and "lifestyle resort."
A unique single-family-house-cum-industrial-loft-esque listing in South Beach, just off Lincoln Road, which has bounced on and off the market since 2017, with successively lower and lower prices, is back, this time asking $2,250,000. That's only $250,000 more than the owner paid for the place, way back in 2013.
This little jewel box in the form of Art Deco known as the Streamline Moderne style a few blocks south of 41st Street in Miami Beach, hit the market on Friday for $2.5 million. There may be loads of small deco hotels and apartment buildings from the 1930s on the beach, but a pristine single family home is a much rarer fish indeed. The Depression decade wasn't the best time for mansion building.
This first floor unit in a small residential building tucked away in the urban, dense, and rather jungly South-of-Fifth part of South Beach has a lot of the privacy-oriented benefits of a house while being part of a condo building. Yes, you have people living above and next to you, but with your own sidewalk-facing entrance and two private terraces, it doesn't really feel like it.
This historic Miami Beach house, designed by architects Phineas Paist and Harold Steward in 1934, has been thoroughly updated while retaining many of the historic details that made it special--such as the wood panelling in the foyer and the plasterwork on the dining room ceiling--and likely losing other bits.
The Ritz-Carlton Residences Miami Beach may have been completed almost a year ago, but the developers have just unveiled three unique model units, with interiors designed by three Italian furniture brands: Baxter, B&B Italia, and Flexform.
This lavish, 6,100 square foot penthouse, directly overlooking the ocean on uber-private Fisher Island, has been on and off the market since the beginning of last year. Done up in white, cream, and very light beiges, along with random bursts of turquoise, the unit was on the market for the first four months of 2019, then off, and has been back on again for about $3.5 million less since December. Is all that white (and the turquoise) a bit much, or is it perfect for an era of ultra-luxe quarantining for the ultra-rich. You decide.
The Miami Beach Botanical Garden has just completed an expansion that extends along the Collins Canal for 350 feet, embracing an underutilized piece of land and expanding the garden to a full three acres. With a design by landscape architect Raymond Jungles, the expansion consists of a meandering path along the canal's southern edge, new gateways, and lush foliage. The new area will be able to be enjoyed by visitors "soon," says the garden, which is currently closed due to the coronavirus pandemic.