Miami Beach, a city of hotels, is often known for its most famous establishments of yesterday and today: places like the Fontainebleau, the Eden Roc, and the Delano. But there are scores of lesser-known hotels that have come and gone and often show different, more surprising sides to the beach. A catalog of hotel postcards from the University of Miami Libraries shows some of the big famous hotels, but even more smaller establishments that have been almost forgotten over the years. Check them out, this way.
Chayo Frank, architect of the famously eclectic Amertec Building in Hialeah, has listed his own home, an equally bold creation in Ponce-Davis, for $14.995 million. Although the Amartec Building, a freeform concrete structure that looked like a fantastical abstraction of a sea monster, was demolished a few years ago, Frank's house, luckily, is beautifully pristine.
The legendary Palm Bay Club had its glorious halcyon days in the 1960s, and '70s, when it was the epitome of glamour for the jet-set cafe society glitterati of its day. Not only did residents have to be rich, but they had to be a lot of fun, according to its creator Connie Dinkler.
Ever dreamed of living in the lavish Everglades Suite in the tower of the Biltmore Hotel in Coral Gables? Well, that might not happen, but here's your chance to buy a penthouse that was obviously inspired by that legendary perch at the top of the Biltmore, and it's also in Coral Gables. Located at the top of the Segovia Tower, this eight bedroom, twelve bath, 8,000 square foot spread was built in the mid-90s, instead of the 1920s-era Biltmore, but it comes with all the wingdings of a lavish '90s penthouse in the sky, including a double-height living room just like the Everglades Suite, and all sorts of other interesting spaces.
A rather psychedelic new gym designed by one of Miami's boldest young architects has just opened on Lincoln Road. Manuel Clavel Rojo of Clavel Arquitectos, perhaps best known locally for designing part of the surreal Museum Garage in the Design District (the section with the cars suspended off the side), has designed the brand-new Miami incarnation of Gymage, a Madrid-based gym and "lifestyle resort."
Omega, the luxury watch brand, is celebrating the 2021 Olympics in Tokyo, which began today, by dressing up their store in the Miami Design District and scattering big Olympic-themed kchotchkies around the neighborhood. One of those is a diorama-like display near the shape of a giant fake pool meant to be an ode to Olympic swimming. Out in the sweltering Miami heat, without water, is it just a big blue tease?
Condo king Jorge Perez, CEO of the Related Group, has listed his longtime home in Coconut Grove, a waterfront villa with over 10,000 square feet of space, for a whopping $33 million. Originally reported by the Wall Street Journal, the listing has now officially hit the MLS along with photos of the exterior and interior of the house. Ever wonder how the guy who built half the condos in Miami actually lives? Well, check it out.
The estate at 41 Arvida Parkway in Gables Estates is currently the most expensive listing on the market in Miami-Dade County. Located on a primo corner lot abutting Biscayne Bay and a canal, the $54.9 million property has, shall we say, a very sort of unique look to it, and has been on the market for almost a year, listed by the well-known and frankly quite preeminent, for better or worse, The Jills Zeder Group.
A richly illustrated and photographed new book on Cuban modernist architecture by Victor Deupi and Jean-Francois Lejeune, both professors at the University of Miami, is a comprehensive survey of an architectural era, which until now has remained largely hidden from view. For several decades on the cusp of the Cuban Revolution, both before and after the event, modern architecture thrived in Cuba.
The Dade Commonwealth Building, built in Miami's halcyon 1920s, the year 1927 to be exact, has stood the test of time. Its unique rooftop crenelation, according to historical lore, was due to a hurricane that hit during construction, slicing the building at the eighth floor and causing the builders to just leave it there. Now it's on the market, according to a listing at Loopnet, for a total of $21 million, with permits approved for its demolition with the exception of the first three stories of the facade.