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Adam Newmann, the long-haired, Kabbalah-following, enigmatic, and egotistical false prophet of WeWork, who was ousted from the company with a severance package that made him a billionaire, has just bought two prime pieces of Bal Harbour real estate for $44 million. Located next to the $65 million peninsula of land where the Bal Harbour Yacht Club used to be, these two properties were purchased from the same investor, Joseph Imbesi, who is parceling off the grand old club's formal landholdings and carefully selling them off.
This monolithic three-story concrete bunker-like building, jazzed up with a contemporary wedge-shaped entrance and a scattering of random windows along the facade, is actually a luxurious private parking garage designed to hold a collection of fifty cars. Located at 3070 SW 38th Court, the 12,354 square foot structure, which also contains an office, a lounge area, and an expansive roof deck, has recently been sold for $4.7 million.
A few days after the Big Bubble covered the sale of Brickell Flatiron Park, from the developers of the Brickell Flatiron tower behind it to a new, and as yet undisclosed, contingent of investors, the Miami Herald posted their coverage of the sale. In that Herald article, the Big Bubble's concern that the park could be fully developed over, turning what is one of Brickell's few green spaces into a retail development, seems like it may be answered.
Flatiron Park, a narrow triangle of land in the center of Brickell that I actively followed and promoted as a park back in the good old days when I was the editor of Curbed Miami, has been sold. For the past five or so years, part of the triangle-shaped piece of land was the site of the sales center for Brickell Flatiron, a condo tower which has recently been completely sold out, with the rest being used as a green space with a landscape design by Raymond Jungles.
So, you've gotten your vaccine and you're READY. TO. HIT. THE. TOWN. and go to one of those fabulous real estate parties that seem like such distant pre-pandemic memories?
This 9,092 square foot house, with a really pretty impressive 8 bedrooms and eleven bathrooms, has a few things that make it stand out from the pack. Listed for $14.9 million in the heart of Golden Beach, it was listed for sale a few months ago for $15.5 million and has already seen a price cut to its current figure.
In the heart of Miami Shores, this roomy midcentury modern (a.k.a. "Miami Modern" here) house sprawls over a half-acre lot, and includes a unique breezeway or loggia that encloses a courtyard-like lawn area in the back yard, offering plenty of protected outdoor living space, all for $2.599 million. Located at 500 NE 96th St, and listed a few days ago, the house was built in 1950, and has quite a few original details intact, including terrazzo floors and even the brightly colored tile bathrooms that are so emblematic of the era yet very often torn out.
Sadly demolished, the Bal Harbour Yacht Club was a magnificent piece of subtropical modern architecture designed by seminal South Florida architect Alfred Browning Parker, in the heart of the exclusive community of Bal Harbour, Florida. Its just-as-magnificent peninsula site survives, with water on three sides and the underwater rights to the lagoon which that peninsula creates, and is now for sale as a private home site for a whopping $65 million.
This 3,559 square foot mixed-use house, hidden in a corner of Miami's Shorecrest neighborhood that many people don't even know exists, comes with a comfortable four bedroom residence above and easily adaptable workspaces below.
This little jewel box in the form of Art Deco known as the Streamline Moderne style a few blocks south of 41st Street in Miami Beach, hit the market on Friday for $2.5 million. There may be loads of small deco hotels and apartment buildings from the 1930s on the beach, but a pristine single family home is a much rarer fish indeed. The Depression decade wasn't the best time for mansion building.