Painter Chuck Close Lists His South Beach Condo at the Setai for $4.1 Million

The renowned painter Chuck Close has listed his two bedroom, two bath condo on the 25th floor of the Setai in Miami Beach for $4.1 million. The artist isn’t going anywhere though. He’s just downsizing, and will occupy one of the two other condos he owns in the building, which he currently uses as a studio and guest quarters. Unit 2506 is listed by agent Marjory Dressler

The unit comes with three original pieces of art by Close, ‘Kara, 2012,’ ‘Phil / Fingerprint’ and ‘Self-Portrait, Woodblock,’ according to a press release. The south-facing 1,316 square foot unit has unobstructed views of the ocean, South Beach, and Downtown Miami. Close recently redecorated the unit, which has extensive built in wooden cabinetry, wood floors, a large master bath with deep soaking tub, and a kitchen with Miele and Subzero appliances.

“I often feel that I’m my most creative when I’m in a space of calm and tranquility. That is what made this home so fitting for me. It’s an environment where you can’t help but feel relaxed,” said Close in a statement. He also owns properties in Manhattan and Long Island.

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2 thoughts on “Painter Chuck Close Lists His South Beach Condo at the Setai for $4.1 Million

  1. Steve Wright

    Three cheers to my friend Sean for writing a story about a person who uses a wheelchair, but not making the story about it.
    As the spouse of a person who uses a wheelchair for mobility, I could wallpaper a mansion with news clips that use the inaccurate, outdated and pejorative “wheelchair-bound,” or “confined to a wheelchair.”
    It is so cool to see that a person with a disability can be, in an article, simply a person.
    Just like it would be weird to focus on a person being black, or Jewish, or very short — in article about them putting their art-filled luxe condo on the market — it would be wrong (and in my household disgusting) to obsesses on a person’s mobility as the only way of identifying them.
    Now if there was a sub feature about unique design elements to serve a person with a disability, that would be a worthy feature.
    But for this kind of story — a perfect touch.
    Sean, you produce a lot of great stuff with limited resources.
    And you seem to be a person who embraces diversity and knows how to treat human beings as human.
    Rather than share this in an email, I think it’s appropriate to pay tribute to this in a comment to be viewed by all readers.
    Cheers,

    Steve

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